Brain Blast: Classroom Post-It Note Activities

Here are several ways to use Post-It notes in your classroom.

SET DAILY GOALS

Kids affix Post-it® notes of their daily goals to a whiteboard upon entering the classroom. (Source: Megan Skogstad via Play.Learn.Share.)

SEQUENCE IT

Stickies are great for constructing flow-maps.

FILL-IN-THE-BLANK

Kids complete cloze statements on a whiteboard with stickies.

STICKIE CHARTS

For SEL ice-breakers, have kids identify their favorite activities, foods, characters, etc.—creating a Post-it® bar graph.

MOTIVATION

Have positive Post-it® notes (“You’ve Got This, Priscilla!”) waiting on each desk before a test.

EXIT TICKETS

Leaving the classroom, students identify how confident they are in their content knowledge by how high on the door the stickies are placed—“High Confidence” to “Low Confidence.”

LOVE SWARM

When a child has surgery, a big illness, or a sad event, have the entire class cover his/her desk with “We Missed You” stickies and cheerful drawings. Feel the love!

TIMELINE

Have kids create a visual timeline of important moments in the chapter before summarizing the chapter.

DOODLE ANNOTATION

Collaboratively invent symbols for literary devices (imagery, symbolism, metaphors, alliteration, irony, repetition, etc.) & have students post stickies next to those devices in their texts.

PEER CRITIQUE

Direct kids to display essays or posters. During feedback rounds, ask learners to use green stickies for positive comments and pink for constructive criticism.

PRE-WRITING

Brainstorm ideas on stickies and then arrange them on a piece of paper in the form of an outline. (Source: High Incidence Accessible Technology)

COLOR-CODED THINKING

As learners read, occasionally ask them to jot down what they are thinking using color-coded strategies:

  1. Ask questions = orange
(“Why did…?”)
  2. Make predictions = green (“I think…will happen because…”)
  3. Monitor comprehension = blue (“I’m noticing…”)
  4. Make evaluations = purple (“In my opinion…”)

(Source: Amy Groesbeck for Storyworks Ideabook)

ICE BREAKER

Kids draw self-portraits and post them on a bulletin board. Then each kid “writes a positive adjective describing each of his classmates on a star shaped sticky note and sticks it to the self-portrait.” (Source: Susan Verner)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Todd Finley

Edutopia Blogger and Asst. Editor || ECU Ed Professor || Founder of Todd's Brain at www.todd-finley.com || Books: Dinkytown Braves and Rethinking Classroom Design.

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